Forms & FAQ Page

Clinic FAQs

How do I set up an appointment? (Some health plans require a referral.)?

Call our appointment line at 985-542-1226 or request an appointment online. Some health plans may require a referral from your primary care physician or have other requirements for care prior to scheduling an appointment. Please contact your insurance provider to learn about your coverage.

Is my first visit just a consultation?

The urologist will evaluate and assess your condition on the first visit.

Why can’t I have all of the tests required for my diagnosis before I see the doctor?

Our specialists need to confirm the appropriate medical treatment.

Questions About Urination

How many times a day does a healthy person urinate?

Urination frequency varies widely according to a number of factors, although for most healthy people going four to eight times a day is typical. More frequent urination or waking up at night to go to the bathroom might mean either a health problem or simply that you’re drinking too much at bedtime.

Are urination problems more of a problem for women than men?

Not necessarily, although urinary incontinence occurs about twice as often in females than males. Pregnancy, childbirth, menopause and female anatomy account for the difference. But of the approximately 12 million sufferers in the United States, about one-third are men. Male incontinence is often associated with prostate problems or treatments.

What increases women’s risk of incontinence?

Often it’s a combination of factors, such as having given birth multiple times, age, obesity and smoking. Other factors include a history of having given vaginal birth, having had hysterectomy, a post-menopause drop in estrogen, chronic bladder infections, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, multiple sclerosis, stroke and spinal cord injury. While age can be a contributor, no one should accept incontinence as an inevitability of growing older.

What increases the risk of incontinence for men?

For men incontinence may be related to a number of health conditions or medical treatments. It can also be caused by lifestyle or family history. Most men have decreased bladder capacity as they age, naturally increasing risk of incontinence to some degree. Other contributors can be smoking, obesity, a high consumption of alcohol and caffeinated and carbonated drinks and injury to the bladder. In addition, just as in women, neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s or Alzheimer’s disease can play a role.

Questions About Kidney Stones

What causes the formation of kidney stones?

Erectile dysfunction, commonly referred to as ED, is the inability to achieve and sustain an erection suitable for sexual intercourse.A change in the normal balance of water salts, mineral and other components in urine creates a process known as urolithiasis in which solid mineral particles cluster in the kidneys. There are different types of stones, including calcium oxalate, uric acid, ammonic magnesium and cystine.

Are there genetic factors in the tendency to get kidney stones?

Yes, such a tendency may be inherited. If others in your family have had them, you may be more prone to them, too.

How do I avoid kidney stones?

Drink lots of water with freshly squeezed lemon juice. Lemon juice contains citric acid, which not only inhibits stone formation but also breaks up small stones just beginning to form. Generally, the more citric acid in your urine, the more protected you are against forming new kidney stones. The most common cause of stones is an insufficient daily water intake. The goal should be to drink enough to keep your urine clear – about eight to ten glasses per day. In addition, studies have indicated that staying physically fit and keeping your weight in check can help as well.

Can diet be a factor in formation of stones?

Yes, levels of calcium, protein, sodium, vitamins C and D, and oxalate-rich foods (dark vegetables, chocolate, nuts, cranberries and coffee and tea, for example) can increase the chances of stones. In general, it’s a good idea to eat less salt and talk to a doctor or dietitian about how much calcium you need daily. If you have had an oxalate kidney stone, you should probably consume fewer oxalate-rich foods. In addition to the ones above, others include spinach, colas, peanuts, beets, rhubarb, berries, beans, tofu, oranges, sweet potatoes and draft beer.

Erectile Dysfunction Questions

What Is Erectile Dysfunction?

Erectile dysfunction, commonly referred to as ED, is the inability to achieve and sustain an erection suitable for sexual intercourse.

Is Erectile Dysfunction a Normal Part of Aging?

No. ED doesn't have to be a part of getting older. While it is true that older men may need more stimulation (such as stroking and touching) to achieve an erection, they should still be able to get an erection and enjoy sex.

Can Erectile Dysfunction Be Prevented?

By reducing your risk factors for heart disease, such as getting to or maintaining a desirable weight, eating a healthy diet, quitting smoking, drinking less or no alcohol, keeping your cholesterol and blood pressure in check, and getting more physical activity, you will also be reducing your risk factors for ED .

How Is Erectile Dysfunction Treated?

There are many different ways ED can be treated, including: oral medications, sex therapy, penile injections, and surgery. Each type of treatment has its own advantages and disadvantages. Talk to your doctor to determine the best treatment for you.